Gropius House: A study through computer modeling

work for the class Geometric Modeling, Fall Term 2001

by Keith McCluskey

 

Final Project

 

Gallery of Assignments:

Analytique and Matrix

Architectural Drawings 1 2 3 4

Renderings 1 2 3 4 5 6

 

The Gropius House, built 1938, designed by Walter Gropius, and located in Lincoln, MA

"Walter Gropius (1883-1969) was a celebrated German architect and teacher, founder of the school of design known as the Bauhaus in Germany, and a leading proponent of modern architecture. This house was his first architectural commission in the United States, built in 1938 as his family home after coming here to teach at Harvard's Graduate School of Design. This was Walter Gropius's home from 1938 until his death in 1969.

The Gropiuses wanted their home to reflect its surroundings and traveled around New England studying its vernacular architecture. In designing the house, Gropius combined traditional elements of New England architecture such as clapboard, brick, and fieldstone, with new, innovative materials, such as glass block, acoustical plaster, and chromed banisters, along with the latest technology in fixtures.

Furthermore, Gropius carefully sited the house to complement its New England habitat on a rise overlooking an apple orchard and fields. The house was also built with economy in mind. The screened porch and terraces extend the living spaces outdoors, it is sited for maximum ventilation and passive solar heating, and all fixtures and building supplies were factory-made items readily available form catalogues and supply houses in the United States. Using the Bauhaus design approach the house utilizes standard materials and products. The result is a regionally inspired house that employs the philosophy and goals of the modern movement."

text and images courtesy of The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities.

References:

Classic Modern Homes of the Thirties, by James and Katherine Morrow Ford, Dover Press, 1990

Great American Houses and their Architectural Styles, by Virginia and Lee McAlester, Abbeville Press, 1994